Next Generation Science Standards Lessons Alignment - Grade 3

Physical Sciences

3-PS2 Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions
Next Generation Science Standards:

3‑PS2‑1.

Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence of the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object.
[Clarification Statement: Examples could include an unbalanced force on one side of a ball can make it start moving; and, balanced forces pushing on a box from both sides will not produce any motion at all.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to one variable at a time: number, size, or direction of forces. Assessment does not include quantitative force size, only qualitative and relative. Assessment is limited to gravity being addressed as a force that pulls objects down.]

3‑PS2‑2.

Make observations and/or measurements of an object’s motion to provide evidence that a pattern can be used to predict future motion.
[Clarification Statement: Examples of motion with a predictable pattern could include a child swinging in a swing, a ball rolling back and forth in a bowl, and two children on a see-saw.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include technical terms such as period and frequency.]

3‑PS2‑3.

Ask questions to determine cause and effect relationships of electric or magnetic interactions between two objects not in contact with each other.
[Clarification Statement: Examples of an electric force could include the force on hair from an electrically charged balloon and the electrical forces between a charged rod and pieces of paper; examples of a magnetic force could include the force between two permanent magnets, the force between an electromagnet and steel paperclips, and the force exerted by one magnet versus the force exerted by two magnets. Examples of cause and effect relationships could include how the distance between objects affects strength of the force and how the orientation of magnets affects the direction of the magnetic force.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to forces produced by objects that can be manipulated by students, and electrical interactions are limited to static electricity.]

3‑PS2‑4.

Define a simple design problem that can be solved by applying scientific ideas about magnets.*
[Clarification Statement: Examples of problems could include constructing a latch to keep a door shut and creating a device to keep two moving objects from touching each other.]

Knowing Science Lessons:

1.1 – Measure That! — A Review of Linear Measurement

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Compare measurements obtained by using a non-standard unit
  • Compare measurements obtained by using a standard unit
  • Explain why a standard unit is more reliable and practical than a non-standard unit
  • Define in their own words what measurement means

1.2 – Measuring Distance and Motion — A Review

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Define distance
  • Explain the importance of initial and final positions when measuring distance traveled
  • Measure the distance an object has traveled in two dimensions
  • Make a simple diagram to show the distance traveled
  • Explain why people need a standard unit for measuring time
  • Use time to measure how long it takes an object to move
  • Demonstrate an understanding that the faster something moves, the less time it takes to go the same distance

1.3 – Let’s Move!

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Explain that a push or a pull causes an object at rest to move
  • Explain that a force can cause a moving object to stop or change direction
  • Explain that it requires more force to move a heavier object than a lighter one
  • Use arrows to represent the direction and effort of a force

1.4 – Balanced and Unbalanced Forces

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Explain that if an object is at rest, two equal forces in opposite directions will cause the object to stay at rest
  • Explain that when two forces are applied to an object, motion results when the forces are not equal or not applied in opposite directions

1.5 – Contact and Non-contact Forces

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Demonstrate that magnetic force is a non-contact force
  • Describe gravity as an invisible, non-contact force that pulls objects closer to the earth
  • Explain that friction is an invisible contact force that opposes motion or makes it difficult for an object to travel across a surface
  • Conduct an experiment to determine which of a set of materials offers the most and least friction to an object traversing it
  • Classify various forces as contact or non-contact

1.6 – Magnets Make Things Move

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Explain what kinds of materials magnets attract
  • Demonstrate that like poles of two magnets repel each other
  • Demonstrate that opposite poles of two magnets attract each other
  • Demonstrate and explain that magnetic force can pass through some non-magnetic materials
  • Construct a toy train that incorporates magnetic levitation

 

Life Sciences

3-LS1 From molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
Next Generation Science Standards:

3‑LS1‑1.

Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death.
[Clarification Statement: Changes organisms go through during their life form a pattern.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment of plant life cycles is limited to those of flowering plants. Assessment does not include details of human reproduction.]

Knowing Science Lessons:

2.1 – Introducing… Life Cycles!

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Identify and sequence life cycles stages common to flowering plants and trees
  • Identify and sequence general animal life cycle stages
  • Differentiate among direct development and complete and incomplete metamorphosis
  • Comprehend and respond to nonfiction reading texts

2.2 – Plant Life Cycles

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Identify, describe, and sequence life cycles stages common to flowering plants
  • Conduct investigations to compare life cycles of familiar plants
  • Make and record accurate observations regarding growth of familiar plants
  • Comprehend and respond to nonfiction reading texts

2.3 – Frog Life Cycles

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Identify, describe and sequence life cycles stages common to most frogs
  • Conduct investigations which relate to frog life cycle stages
  • Make and record accurate observations regarding growth of tadpoles and froglets
  • Recognize and understand that conducting science investigations involving animals requires safe and ethical practices
  • Comprehend and respond to nonfiction reading texts

 

3-LS2 Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics
Next Generation Science Standards:

3‑LS2‑1.

Construct an argument that some animals form groups that help members survive.
 

Knowing Science Lessons:

2.5 – Animal Communities

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Differentiate between types of animal groups and the purposes of each
  • Associate specific animals with each type of group
  • Explain how different senses are used for communication between group members
  • Comprehend and respond to nonfiction reading texts

 

3-LS3 Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits
Next Generation Science Standards:

3‑LS3‑1.

Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence that plants and animals have traits inherited from parents and that variation of these traits exists in a group of similar organisms.
[Clarification Statement: Patterns are the similarities and differences in traits shared between offspring and their parents, or among siblings. Emphasis is on organisms other than humans.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include genetic mechanisms of inheritance and prediction of traits. Assessment is limited to non-human examples.]

3‑LS3‑2.

Use evidence to support the explanation that traits can be influenced by the environment.
[Clarification Statement: Examples of the environment affecting a trait could include normally tall plants grown with insufficient water are stunted; and, a pet dog that is given too much food and little exercise may become overweight.]

Knowing Science Lessons:

2.4 – Nature or Nurture—Traits in Animals and Plants

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Differentiate among inherited, learned, and acquired traits
  • Understand that physical and behavioral traits are passed from parent to offspring
  • Conduct a structured inquiry survey about inherited human traits
  • Explore how nature has influenced human learning and technology
  • Explain the role of trait variation in the survival of plants and animals
  • Comprehend and respond to nonfiction reading texts

 

3-LS4 Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity
Next Generation Science Standards:

3‑LS4‑1.

Analyze and interpret data from fossils to provide evidence of the organisms and the environments in which they lived long ago.
[Clarification Statement: Examples of data could include type, size, and distributions of fossil organisms. Examples of fossils and environments could include marine fossils found on dry land, tropical plant fossils found in Arctic areas, and fossils of extinct organisms.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include identification of specific fossils or present plants and animals. Assessment is limited to major fossil types and relative ages.]

3‑LS4‑2.

Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.
[Clarification Statement: Examples of cause and effect relationships could be plants that have larger thorns than other plants may be less likely to be eaten by predators; and, animals that have better camouflage coloration than other animals may be more likely to survive and therefore more likely to leave offspring.]

3‑LS4‑3.

Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.
[Clarification Statement: Examples of evidence could include needs and characteristics of the organisms and habitats involved. The organisms and their habitat make up a system in which the parts depend on each other.]

3‑LS4‑4.

Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.*
[Clarification Statement: Examples of environmental changes could include changes in land characteristics, water distribution, temperature, food, and other organisms.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to a single environmental change. Assessment does not include the greenhouse effect or climate change.]

Knowing Science Lessons:

2.4 – Nature or Nurture—Traits in Animals and Plants

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Differentiate among inherited, learned, and acquired traits
  • Understand that physical and behavioral traits are passed from parent to offspring
  • Conduct a structured inquiry survey about inherited human traits
  • Explore how nature has influenced human learning and technology
  • Explain the role of trait variation in the survival of plants and animals
  • Comprehend and respond to nonfiction reading texts

2.6 – Fossils Tell Stories of Prehistoric Life on Earth

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Explain what a fossil is
  • Describe how fossils are formed
  • Develop an argument from evidence that Earth’s environments/organisms have changed over millions of years

 

Earth and Space Sciences

3-ESS2 Earth's Systems
Next Generation Science Standards:

3‑ESS2‑1.

Represent data in tables and graphical displays to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season.
[Clarification Statement: Examples of data could include average temperature, precipitation, and wind direction.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment of graphical displays is limited to pictographs and bar graphs. Assessment does not include climate change.]

3‑ESS2‑2.

Obtain and combine information to describe climates in different regions of the world.
 

Knowing Science Lessons:

3.1 – What is Weather?

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Identify and describe components of weather (temperature, precipitation, air pressure, wind, and humidity)
  • Make observations and collect data on local weather over a period of time
  • Build working models of weather instruments
  • Describe the relationship between the water cycle and weather
  • Match cloud formations with weather conditions
  • Describe the interdependent components of weather in forecasting
  • Comprehend and respond to nonfiction reading texts.

3.2 – Climate and Biomes

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Identify and describe general characteristics of polar, tropical, and temperate climate zones
  • Explain the connection between Earth’s orbit and seasons in temperate zones
  • Understand the concept of biome and make comparisons between biomes in each climate zone
  • Comprehend and respond to nonfiction reading texts

 

3-ESS3 Earth and Human Activity
Next Generation Science Standards:

3‑ESS3‑1.

Make a claim about the merit of a design solution that reduces the impacts of a weather-related hazard.*
[Clarification Statement: Examples of design solutions to weather-related hazards could include barriers to prevent flooding, wind resistant roofs, and lightning rods.]

Knowing Science Lessons:

3.3 – Extreme Weather

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Identify and describe general characteristics of tornadoes, hurricanes, and winter storms
  • Understand the damage that each type of extreme weather event may cause
  • Comprehend and respond to nonfiction reading texts

3.4 – Hurricane House

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Understand the basic engineering design process (define a problem, brainstorm possible solutions, build, test, evaluate, revise, retest, communicate)
  • Identify hazards to property associated with extreme weather conditions
  • Learn the basics of house construction
  • Match stormproof technology to appropriate focus areas of the house
  • Design, build and test a model of a house capable of withstanding extreme weather
  • Work cooperatively in a small group to accomplish the task
  • Comprehend and respond to nonfiction reading texts

 

Engineering Design

3-5-ETS1 Engineering Design
Next Generation Science Standards:

3-5-ETS1‑1.

Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes specified criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, or cost.
 

3-5-ETS1‑2.

Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.
 

3-5-ETS1‑3.

Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.
 

Knowing Science Lessons:

1.6 – Magnets Make Things Move (Grade 3)

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Explain what kinds of materials magnets attract
  • Demonstrate that like poles of two magnets repel each other
  • Demonstrate that opposite poles of two magnets attract each other
  • Demonstrate and explain that magnetic force can pass through some non-magnetic materials
  • Construct a toy train that incorporates magnetic levitation

3.4 – Hurricane House (Grade 3)

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Understand the basic engineering design process (define a problem, brainstorm possible solutions, build, test, evaluate, revise, retest, communicate)
  • Identify hazards to property associated with extreme weather conditions
  • Learn the basics of house construction
  • Match stormproof technology to appropriate focus areas of the house
  • Design, build and test a model of a house capable of withstanding extreme weather
  • Work cooperatively in a small group to accomplish the task
  • Comprehend and respond to nonfiction reading texts

1.6 – Transferring and Using Energy (Grade 4)

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Construct and explain devices that use mechanical energy to produce electricity
  • Construct and explain devices that convert chemical energy into electricity
  • Construct and explain devices that convert solar energy into electricity
  • Construct an electrical circuit and explain how it works
  • Collaborate with others to build devices that convert energy from one form to another
  • Explain that electricity is our most prominent form of energy because it can be stored and transferred easily and over long distances

2.1 – Animal Classification (Grade 4)

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Compare and review traits of living and nonliving things
  • Compare traits of vertebrates and invertebrates
  • Explain how animals’ physical structures and body coverings may be used to classify them
  • Identify and compare observable characteristics of each major vertebrate group

2.2 – Physical Structures, Survival, and Crayfish (Grade 4)

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Associate the physical structures of animals with basic needs
  • Associate animal senses with survival behaviors
  • Identify, describe, and associate the physical structures and behaviors of crayfish with their basic needs
  • Design and construct a “prosthetic device” to replace a lost crayfish physical structure

2.3 – Plant Structures and Survival (Grade 4)

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Associate the physical structures of plants (roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and fruits) with basic needs of plants
  • Associate the physical structures of plants with their specific functions and explain how these structures work together as a system in the plant
  • Observe and compare characteristics of plant structures in a variety of plants
  • Comprehend and respond to nonfiction reading texts

4.1 – Amplitude and Wavelength (Grade 4)

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Describe waves using scientific vocabulary
  • Model waves graphically
  • Explain that waves are caused by repetitive motion
  • Construct a simple wave generator

4.2 – How We See (Grade 4)

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Explain that light travels in a straight line
  • Explain that light bends
  • Explain that light reflects off objects
  • Construct a simple model of the human eye

4.3 – Using Waves to Transfer Information (Grade 4)

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Explain what a code is
  • Create a code to send information to a recipient
  • Decode a coded message from a sender
  • Describe the difference between digital and analog information
  • Explain the role of waves in transmitting information