Next Generation Science Standards Lessons Alignment - Grade 6

Physical Sciences

MS-PS1 Matter and its Interactions
Next Generation Science Standards:
 

MS‑PS1‑1.

Develop models to describe the atomic composition of simple molecules and extended structures.
[Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on developing models of molecules that vary in complexity. Examples of simple molecules could include ammonia and methanol. Examples of extended structures could include sodium chloride or diamonds. Examples of molecular-level models could include drawings, 3D ball and stick structures, or computer representations showing different molecules with different types of atoms.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include valence electrons and bonding energy, discussing the ionic nature of subunits of complex structures, or a complete description of all individual atoms in a complex molecule or extended structure is not required.]

MS‑PS1‑2.

Analyze and interpret data on the properties of substances before and after the substances interact to determine if a chemical reaction has occurred.
[Clarification Statement: Examples of reactions could include burning sugar or steel wool, fat reacting with sodium hydroxide, and mixing zinc with hydrogen chloride.] [Assessment boundary: Assessment is limited to analysis of the following properties: density, melting point, boiling point, solubility, flammability, and odor.]

Knowing Science Lessons:

3.1 – Matter

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Define matter
  • Describe some properties of matter
  • Perform experiments that test whether properties of matter can change
  • Describe what a chemical reaction is

3.2 – Fundamental Blocks of Matter

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Explain what an atom is and describe its parts
  • Describe a molecule
  • Describe the classification of atoms
  • Explore the characteristics of some of the elements on the Periodic Table

 

MS-PS2 Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions
Next Generation Science Standards:

MS‑PS2‑1.

Apply Newton’s Third Law to design a solution to a problem involving the motion of two colliding objects.*
[Clarification Statement: Examples of practical problems could include the impact of collisions between two cars, between a car and stationary objects, and between a meteor and a space vehicle.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to vertical or horizontal interactions in one dimension.]

MS‑PS2‑2.

Plan an investigation to provide evidence that the change in an object’s motion depends on the sum of the forces on the object and the mass of the object.
[Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on balanced (Newton’s First Law) and unbalanced forces in a system, qualitative comparisons of forces, mass and changes in motion (Newton’s Second Law), frame of reference, and specification of units.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to forces and changes in motion in one-dimension in an inertial reference frame and to change in one variable at a time. Assessment does not include the use of trigonometry.]

Knowing Science Lessons:

1.2 – Forces and Motion

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Demonstrate how to apply a force
  • Demonstrate that forces have a direction and intensity
  • Explain that when an object changes its motion it is due to a force
  • Explain that a change of motion is related to the direction and intensity of the applied force

1.3 – Forces and Equilibrium

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Explain that balanced forces produce equilibrium
  • Explain that unbalanced forces produce motion
  • Explain that to every applied force an object reacts with an equal and opposite force

1.4 – Forces and Motion

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Describe gravity as a force that causes objects to move toward the center of the Earth
  • Label a diagram correctly with arrows showing the direction of the gravitational force
  • Explain that there is a vertical tension along a string being pulled down by a weight

 

MS-PS3 Energy
Next Generation Science Standards:

MS‑PS3‑1.

Construct and interpret graphical displays of data to describe the relationships of kinetic energy to the mass of an object and to the speed of an object.
[Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on descriptive relationships between kinetic energy and mass separately from kinetic energy and speed. Examples could include riding a bicycle at different speeds, rolling different sizes of rocks downhill, and getting hit by a wiffle ball versus a tennis ball.]

Knowing Science Lessons:

2.1 – Energy

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Define energy
  • Explain the difference between kinetic and potential energy
  • Give evidence that energy can be transferred from one form to another
  • Create a graphical display of data to relate kinetic energy to the mass and speed of an object

 

MS-PS4 Energy
Next Generation Science Standards:

MS‑PS4‑1.

Use mathematical representations to describe a simple model for waves that includes how the amplitude of a wave is related to the energy in a wave.
[Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on describing waves with both qualitative and quantitative thinking.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include electromagnetic waves and is limited to standard repeating waves.]

Knowing Science Lessons:

2.2 – Waves

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Define a wave
  • Identify the characteristics of waves
  • Describe the relationship between the amplitude of a wave to the magnitude of disturbance of a medium
  • Explains why it is useful to calculate the speed of a wave

 

Life Sciences

MS-LS1 From molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
Next Generation Science Standards:

MS‑LS1‑1.

Conduct an investigation to provide evidence that living things are made of cells; either one cell or many different numbers and types of cells.
[Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on developing evidence that living things are made of cells, distinguishing between living and non-living things, and understanding that living things may be made of one cell or many and varied cells.]

MS‑LS1‑2.

Develop and use a model to describe the function of a cell as a whole and ways parts of cells contribute to the function.
[Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the cell functioning as a whole system and the primary role of identified parts of the cell, specifically the nucleus, chloroplasts, mitochondria, cell membrane, and cell wall.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment of organelle structure/function relationships is limited to the cell wall and cell membrane. Assessment of the function of the other organelles is limited to their relationship to the whole cell. Assessment does not include the biochemical function of cells or cell parts.]

MS‑LS1‑8.

Gather and synthesize information that sensory receptors respond to stimuli by sending messages to the brain for immediate behavior or storage as memories.
[Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include mechanisms for the transmission of this information.]

Knowing Science Lessons:

1.1 – Living and Non-Living

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Describe the properties of living and non-living things Explain that some non-living things share properties of living organisms Explain how a bacterial culture is taken

1.2 – Cells — The Basic Units of Life

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Describe what a cell is Explain the function of a cell membrane Explain the difference between a prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell Explain the difference between plant and animal cells Provide examples of specialized cells in the human body

1.3 – Parts of a Cell

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Identify the major parts of a cell (nucleus, chloroplasts, mitochondria, cell membrane, and cell wall) and their functions Explain why cell walls and chloroplasts are found only in plant cells Explain that all cells have the same basic parts to do specific tasks

1.4 – Cell Biology

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Describe the structure of a cell membrane Describe the function of a cell membrane Work with a small group to construct a model of a cell membrane

1.5 – The Cell Nucleus — Home of DNA

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Describe the role the nucleus plays in the cell Describe the structure of a DNA molecule Describe what a gene is

1.6 – The Brain – Control Central

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Describe the central nervous system Describe the peripheral nervous system Explain which parts of the brain are responsible for specific sensory and motor functions Explain in general terms how a message is transmitted from neuron to neuron Explain how a reflex works Describe some of the ways we can “see” into the brain

1.7 – The Sensory Receptors

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Describe where the sensory receptors are for seeing, hearing, touching, smelling, and tasting Describe the sequence of events from stimulation of sensory receptors to the arrival of nerve impulses in the brain Explain that the brain makes sense of nerve impulses sent to it from various sensory receptors

 

MS-LS2 Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics
Next Generation Science Standards:

MS‑LS2‑3.

Develop a model to describe the cycling of matter and flow of energy among living and nonliving parts of an ecosystem.
[Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on describing the conservation of matter and flow of energy into and out of various ecosystems, and on defining the boundaries of the system.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include the use of chemical reactions to describe the processes.]

Knowing Science Lessons:

2.1 – Nature — The Master Recycler

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Describe the difference between an open and closed system
  • Describe the water cycle
  • Describe the nitrogen cycle
  • Describe the carbon/oxygen cycle
  • Explain why living organisms need energy
  • Obtain information from print and electronic sources

2.2 – Energy Requirements of Living Organisms and Man - Made Devices

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Describe how living organisms depend on energy
  • Describe the similarities between the energy requirements of mechanical and electrical devices and the energy requirements of living organisms

2.3 – Ecology and Engineering

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Explain that matter must be cycled in a closed system
  • Explain how the water cycle works in a model ecosystem
  • Explain how the nitrogen cycle works in a fish tank
  • Draw simple diagrams of a water filtration system

 

Earth and Space Sciences

MS-ESS1 Earth's Place in the Universe
Next Generation Science Standards:

MS‑ESS1‑3.

Analyze and interpret data to determine scale properties of objects in the solar system.
[Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the analysis of data from Earth-based instruments, space-based telescopes, and spacecraft to determine similarities and differences among solar system objects. Examples of scale properties include the sizes of an object’s layers (such as crust and atmosphere), surface features (such as volcanoes), and orbital radius. Examples of data include statistical information, drawings and photographs, and models.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include recalling facts about properties of the planets and other solar system bodies.]

Knowing Science Lessons:

1.2 – Our Immense Solar System

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Use AUs to measure the relative distance of the planets from the sun and from each other
  • Construct a scaled model of the solar system

 

MS-ESS2 Earth's Systems
Next Generation Science Standards:

MS‑ESS2‑1.

Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth's materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.
[Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the processes of melting, crystallization, weathering, deformation, and sedimentation, which act together to form minerals and rocks through the cycling of Earth’s materials.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include the identification and naming of minerals.]

MS‑ESS2‑2.

Construct an explanation based on evidence for how geoscience processes have changed Earth's surface at varying time and spatial scales.
[Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on how processes change Earth’s surface at time and spatial scales that can be large (such as slow plate motions or the uplift of large mountain ranges) or small (such as rapid landslides or microscopic geochemical reactions), and how many geoscience processes (such as earthquakes, volcanoes, and meteor impacts) usually behave gradually but are punctuated by catastrophic events. Examples of geoscience processes include surface weathering and deposition by the movements of water, ice, and wind. Emphasis is on geoscience processes that shape local geographic features, where appropriate.]

Knowing Science Lessons:

2.1 – Weathering

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Define weathering
  • Describe the several types of physical weathering
  • Describe the process of chemical weathering
  • Describe differential weathering

2.2 – Rocks Re-cycling

The objectives for this lesson are:

  • Describe how sedimentary rocks are formed
  • Describe how metamorphic rocks are formed
  • Describe how igneous rocks are formed
  • Explain what a cycle is
  • Describe rock cycles